HomeKit Review support to the dwelling-iota alarm system the best option for Apple users

When I was in my early 20’s, I worked for an independent telephone company in Ringgold, GA. One of the projects I worked on was the construction of a home and business security products. I have worked with clients in a sales role after we had the product up and running. I say all this to say that I am a bit of a veteran of the home security industry. I have sold hundreds of thousands of dollars of Honeywell alarm systems. I know that systems can be easily controlled by other companies. I understand that the benefits of wired versus wireless networks as well. In my current house, the builder had a DSC system installed by a local alarm company that I have been using since we moved in back in 2013. Over the years, I’ve upgraded my home to include many smart home aspects. Still, the security system is something that I had not touched until I about the remains of the system with HomeKit integration. Is it still the best home security system for Apple users? We are going to dig in my examination of the remains, iota alarm system.

One of the main differences between the various DIY alarm systems compared to traditional methods is the place where the devices are assembled and how they communicate. With my existing alarm system, there are the door triggers drive connected to a central panel in my dressing room. The keyboard and a motion sensor are also wired. 110V powers of all, and it has a battery backup. The only method of communication is a traditional telephone line (which I still have for 911 purposes for my children).

With the systems of DIY, it is almost always a kind of wireless technology between the sensors and the base station. Most DIY alarms work off of your internet connection and often include a SIM card for the cellular backup.

I had been monitoring various alarm systems over the years, as the Nest is Secure (I have Nest thermostats), and SimpliSafe, but I have not found one that made me want to redo all my installation completely. Once I got this home has added HomeKit support to their iota starter kit, I start looking very closely.

I had recently purchased an August lock so that the ability to automatically disable the alarm when I opened the door was exciting. After a few days of research, I made my purchase. I chose the abode iota starter kit, adding a dedicated keyboard, two smoke monitors, three slim, door sensors, and a motion detector. The iota starter kit includes a base station, a door sensor, and remote control. The base station consists of a built-in 1080p camera (works with HomeKit) and an integrated motion sensor. The base station works on Wi-Fi (requires ethernet for the initial configuration), has a cellular backup option, and includes a built-in battery in case of failure. The additional motion sensor will replace the one that is in my living room, and I’m going to mount the keyboard in place of my existing one.

One of the aspects of DIY alarm systems that I don’t like is the size of the door sensors are. They are generally white bricks to climb to the top of the door. The technology is relatively simple to them, though. A part of the door sensor is a magnet, and another is the transmitter. When the door is open, the “seal” is broken, and that sends an alarm signal.

8 Total Score
Excellent!

With the systems of DIY, it is almost always a kind of wireless technology between the sensors and the base station. Most DIY alarms work off of your internet connection and often include a SIM card for the cellular backup.

Add your review
We will be happy to hear your thoughts

      Leave a Reply

      AppleiPhonestop - Apple iPhone News and Rumours All Day
      Login/Register access is temporary disabled
      Compare items
      • Laptops (0)
      Compare
      0